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How to Reach Out for an Informational Interview | The Intern Hustle

Hey there! Welcome to The Intern Hustle’s hub on YouTube. I’m Jenna Rein, and in this video you’re going to learn how you should be reaching out to the people that you would like to connect with for an informational interview. ‘Cause you do want them to say yes when you reach out, right? Then stick around and take note of my 6 tips on how to reach out for an informational interview. Do you find yourself watching this and thinking “what is an informational interview?” Not to worry – I’ll cover that too. Hey there! I’m Jenna Rein from theinternhustle.com, and this is Initiative Muscle Monday. Helping you to start each week with an intentional step toward a successful future.

Let’s do this! So, what is an informational interview? In the most basic of explanations, it is an interview where the tables are turned. You are interviewing the other person and you’re asking them to share “information” with you about their career, their company, their industry, how they got their start, and lessons that they’ve learned along the way. Informational interviews are a great tool to help you determine professional fit in your own life. I have 6 tips for you today on how you should be reaching out when you request an informational interview with someone. And stick around to the end of this video for a special bonus email template that I’m going to be sharing with you.

This is a template that you’re going to be able to use when you’re sending those emails requesting your informational interviews. Alright, are you ready? Let’s dive in! Show that you’ve done your research. You want to be specific with your ask. Because people can tell when you just copy and paste an email to them that you’ve already sent to 10 other people. And I can tell you from experience, that I’m much more inclined to respond to someone when they ask me specific questions about my career, or they’re looking for specific advice. Now, it’s easy to just say I’d like to learn more about your career path. But show me that you took the time to actually research my background and that you want to know about a specific experience with a company or an individual that has shaped where I’m at today. Mention mutual connections or shared experiences. Did a family member or friend suggest that you connect with this person? Great – let them know. Or are they an alumni from the school that you attend? Make the connection.

Or, did you just read about something in their bio that you share in common with them? Maybe it’s a favorite band or place that you enjoy traveling to. These are all things that you want to incorporate when you reach out in order to establish a deeper connection up front. Make it convenient for them to say “yes”.

Suggest a phone call or offer to meet them in a location of their choice. But the amount of emails that people get today on a daily basis, it’s insane. If they’re getting an email from you and it’s not clear that you are flexible and that you’re going to make the time and the place very convenient for them, then they’re likely going to put the email aside and deal with it later. And chances are your email is going to then get lost in the depths of their inbox and you may never actually hear from them after all. So, you want to make it easy for them to give you an instant reply, and an easy one, and tell you yes. Respect their time. Informational interviews should be no more than 30 min. (20 min. is really what you’re shooting for here). This goes along with my last point on making it easy for them to say yes. Make sure that they understand that you know how busy they are and that you’re coming prepared to make this a good use of their time.

Include your availability for several dates and times. Don’t make them do the scheduling work. If you offer up a few different options that work for you on when you can meet, then they can easily check their calendar and get back to you. Or better yet, they can go hands off all together and pass it on to their assistant for all of the scheduling work. Again, how can you make it as convenient as possible for them to say “yes” to you. Close your email with a call to action to drive next steps. Guide their next action. Which should be responding to your email and the request that you’ve made for an informational interview. Say that you are looking forward to hearing from them. Ask them to let you know which of the options that you suggested works best for them. And then offer to send out a calendar invite once they confirm. If you follow these 6 tips when reaching out to request an informational interview, your chances of actually getting the interview are going to be much higher.

Now I mentioned at the beginning of this video that if you stuck around til the end, I have a bonus email template for you to use when you actually reach out. Check the description below this video for the link to download this free email template. The worksheet also includes a recap of the 6 tips that I shared with you in today’s video. So go grab it now and best of luck with your informational interviews! If this video gave you some new insights today, please give it a like and share it with a friend or two. And subscribe to this channel so that you don’t miss out on future videos by hitting that subscribe button below. In support of your hustle…I’ll see you next Monday!.

Read More: Y/PROJECT AW16 – SHOW -promoted by the interns at Fashion Buyers Network -Team Seton Hall

Read More: ONLINE JOBS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS IN 2020 | The Intern Hustle

As found on YouTube and published by Fashion Buyers Network Interns, Members and Staff

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Get an Internship with No Experience | The Intern Hustle

There are a lot of misconceptions out there when it comes to internships. When you hear things like, “You need experience in order to get an internship.”, you’re most likely hearing that from someone who has never had an internship before. Because, the opposite’s actually true. Internships exist for you to gain experience. And I’m going to bust through this common no-experience, no- internship myth and break down how you can make your first internship happen in today’s video. Hey there! I’m Jenna Rein, from theinternhustle.com, and this is Initiative Muscle Monday. Helping you to start each week with an intentional step toward a successful future. Let’s do this! So I definitely remember feeling like I had no idea where to start when it came to finding my first internship. And on top of that, I thought that no one would even take me on as an intern, and take me seriously, because I had zero experience. Spoiler alert – I now know that just about everyone feels this way when they are first starting out.

However, once I understood how important it is to get some internship experience while I was in college, I got serious about looking for opportunities. And what I learned, is that it’s all about finding the right first opportunity. So what do I mean by the right first opportunity? Everyone starts somewhere. Think about this — Many of the best actors started off doing small-time commercial gigs and side hustling as a waiter. They didn’t just jump to Academy Award Best-Picture films. Now, maybe your dream is to intern for someplace like Google. That’s excellent, and you should absolutely go after that dream! But you’re going to need to work your way up to Google.

Given how competitive Google’s internship program is known to be, your first goal should be to start early and gain as much internship experience as you can elsewhere. Build up your skills and build up your resume, and then apply for an internship with Google. Now, you need to start by setting some realistic expectations with yourself, and then identifying your best fit first opportunities from there. Ok – So where should you even start when trying to find your first internship opportunity? Where do you get that first round of experience? Look, the whole internship search is easier said than done, I know. But since you likely won’t check every box on your internship dream list this first time around, I recommend that you at least identify your priorities.

Come up with a list of your priorities and then rank them. So think about things like company size, the location, paid vs. unpaid internship, the structure (or maybe the lack there of structure) that an internship program may have, does the company have perks that they offer to their interns?, do you have exposure to a specific industry or just general professional experience? Put it all down, and rank your priorities. What is most important to you for your first round of experience, knowing that you’re not going to check all of those boxes right up front? Once you create this priority list, start searching for opportunities that are in line with your priorities.

Time to bust through the myth that you need experience to get an internship! At the end of the day, employers just want interns who show a genuine interest in their company and are self-starters. If you can present yourself with an eagerness to be a contributing member to their team and you show up with the work ethic to match, you will find an internship. There are so many opportunities out there, you just have to be intentional with your search and not get too ahead of yourself with your first steps.

Continue to build key relationships along the way, and more doors will open for you over time. You got this! Just focus on getting your foot in that first door, do a solid job, and then continue to stack your experience with the opportunities that follow. If this video gave you some new insights today, please give it a like and share it with a friend or two. And subscribe to this channel and join me over the next few weeks as I bust through some more myths and share the truth about internships. In support of your hustle…I will see you next Monday!.

Read More: Y/PROJECT AW16 – SHOW -promoted by the interns at Fashion Buyers Network -Team Seton Hall

Read More: How to Make Your Resume Stand Out for Internships | The Intern Hustle

As found on YouTube and published by Fashion Buyers Network Interns, Members and Staff

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How to Make Your Resume Stand Out for Internships | The Intern Hustle

Hey guys, I’m Jenna Rein. And this is The Intern Hustle’s YouTube channel. I share new videos every Monday to help you flex your initiative muscle and take control of your future. In today’s video I’m sharing a few tips on how you can make your resume stand out for internships. Now if you’re new here, you may be thinking cool Jenna — Who are you and why do you know about this? Well, if you want my full story you can head over to theinternhustle.com and check it out, but the short story is I had four internships in college (a couple of which were extremely competitive to get my foot in the door at) And so I know a thing or two about how to get yourself the best shot at the internship by putting together a solid resume.

Hey there, I’m Jenna Rein from theinternhustle.com and this is Initiative Muscle Monday, helping you to start each week with an intentional step toward a successful future. Let’s do this! Now before I go into the tips, I want to start by saying… Set aside the time to work on your resume, and then do it. Your resume always takes more time than you think it will and if you want to do it right, you need to plan ahead and give yourself the time to do a quality job. Okay, Let’s break down the tips. Start by gathering relevant experiences as early as you can. If you’re still in high school or early in your college years, what jobs can you get now that will help you stand out when you’re applying for internships you want later? For example, in high school I really already had an interest in training athletes. And so no, I hadn’t applied to my major yet or taken any classes to test my interest, but it was an interest of mine and I decided to pay attention to it.

I decided to find a job in high school that would translate into relevant experience later. I ended up getting a fitness floor position at a reputable health club. Was it glamorous? No. I wiped sweat off weight machines as part of my job. But what high school job really is that glamorous? Definitely an upgrade from changing diapers while babysitting I will tell you that. But it did give me hands-on experience in a training setting, and more importantly in the future when I was applying for internships, it showed companies that I was intentional from an early age. I wasn’t just trying to check a box and get an internship. I had previous experience in this field and I was willing to put in the work. So as you work to gather this relevant experience start to create inventory of it. Keep a journal about things you learn on the job. Hard skills, like new softwares (or maybe you learned Adobe Photoshop), machine operations, or training certifications you’ve obtained. And soft skills you’ve developed like, communication, or time management, problem-solving.

Next, be sure to capture specific volunteer or extracurricular experience you have as well — specific things you’ve done in college that showcase the skills and interests that you have. And if you haven’t been documenting your experience as you go and you’re just now playing catch-up, go ahead and follow this exercise: I want you to set a timer for twenty to thirty minutes and write down any and all experience that comes to mind. Just get your juices flowing. Nothing’s stupid. This is just for your reference. You will be amazed with how much comes up as you start brainstorming and putting pen to paper. Okay. Got your experience inventory? Great! We will come back to this in a minute. Now this next point you’re gonna hear a lot, but it’s because it’s important… Imagine that? Make sure that you tailor your resume to each and every internship position that you’re applying for. Why? Because recruiters are receiving A LOT of resumes, and on average they’re only scanning your resume for about six seconds before deciding if they’re gonna move it forward to next steps or put it in the trash can.

So if you fail to speak to what a recruiter is looking for on your resume, then you can pretty much guarantee your resumes going into the trash can. Now I know if you’re applying to a lot of internships this can seem like a lot of work. Unique resumes for every application? But that’s exactly why you should take the extra time to do it. Because most of your peers aren’t. Spend a little bit more time upfront and gift yourself the wonderful benefit of out-shining your competition. Now the best way to do this is to pull up the job description for the internships you’re applying for, and the details about the company values and culture. Then pull up your experience inventory and start connecting the dots. Not all of it has to be a pure hard skill connection to what they’re looking for. You can also draw attention to other experience you have — volunteer, extracurriculars, ties into their company culture — look for parallels and craft your resume accordingly.

Be interesting and show your personality. Always start your bullet points on your resume with the most relevant accomplishments first. Now notice I said accomplishments and not responsibilities. That’s because no one cares what you were responsible for. How are they supposed to know that you actually did what you are responsible for? They want to know what you accomplished and the best way to show someone what you accomplished is by giving them concrete examples and showing them the numbers.

Quantify wherever you can. So back to my high school job as a fitness floor trainer… Maybe instead of just saying, instructed members on proper use of weightlifting machines. I could say, led an average of 15, 30-minute introduction to weightlifting sessions with club members each week. So when it comes to tailoring your resume, and creating stand out quantifiable accomplishments, I know you can do it. You just have to put in a little effort. No matter how little experience you have, it is possible So give it a try and tailor your experience. And then try harder. And if you find you want some help, I happen to be pretty good at this… just sayin’. You can sign up for a one on one resume review session with me and I will show you how it’s done. I’ll link to that in the description below if you’re interested, and you can check it out after this video.

I will be back in future videos with common resume mistakes to avoid and all the tips you need to format your resume like a boss. If you feel like getting a head start on the formatting part, I do have a comprehensive resume review checklist that you can download for free now and be well on your way. I’ll link to that in the description below. Finally, if you found this video helpful, and you want to see more like it, please give it a like and share it with a friend or two. And then subscribe to this channel so that you’re in the loop when the next resume review videos are released.

This is a new channel, so all of the love helps. Thanks guys, I will see you back here next Monday with another video..

Read More: Y/PROJECT AW16 – SHOW -promoted by the interns at Fashion Buyers Network -Team Seton Hall

As found on YouTube and published by Fashion Buyers Network Interns, Members and Staff